What does STATUS A, B, C & D mean?

Within a construction project and the commissioning process, documents [technical, drawing, method statement, etc] that are utilized for conveying detailed information from or to the manufacturers, site teams, design, and commissioning teams will need to be issued for approval, reviewed, and provided a status from the client team.

This is to accept that, what is being provided is in line with project/design and contract requirements, for works to commence.

Below details the Status, Review Process, and Types of Documents that would generally need to be provided for comment/approval.

We generally have come across two different types of status on projects:

  • The first is where a Status of A, B, C is given
  • The second is where a Status of A, B, C & D is given

Whilst the two look similar there are slight differences.

The below table details the status of documentation and what they can mean on a project. As can be seen the Status D, is basically included to provide the reviewer with an ability to fully reject a document. It usually means that the submitted document does not meet what the title is, is completely inadequate to explain or describe what its intended for, or there is significant information and data missing.

StatusStatus A,B,CStatus A,B,C,D
ADocument reviewed

No comments

Works can commence
Document reviewed

No comments

Works can commence
BDocument reviewed comments noted

Works can commence taking onboard comments
Document reviewed comments noted

Works can commence taking onboard comments
CDocument reviewed comments noted

No works can allowed to commence

Revise and reissue document for approval
Document reviewed comments noted

No works can allowed to commence

Revise and reissue document for approval
Dn/aDocument reviewed

Not meet any requirements of project

Fully rejected

No works can allowed to commence

Revise and reissue document for approval

Status A, B, C & D Table

What is the Review Process?

The review process is usually pretty straight forward as noted below:

  • General Contractor / Main Contractor and their teams create the documentation / information.
  • Internal Review conducted by Main Contractor Engineers.
  • If internal review ok, then issue to *client team via email or some form of electronic platform such as Aconex / Asite / Procore etc.
  • Client team review and provide comment / approval based upon Technical, Installation, Commissioning & Maintainability.

*The Client Team would consist of the Client, Project Manager, Designer, Commissioning Consultant, Facilities Team etc. [if on board early enough].

What types of documents are usually issued for review?

Which documents will require to be issued for approval, will generally be dictated by the specific project/contract documents. But as an outline, the following types of documents would usually be needed relating to the commissioning process [note this is not a fully concise list and just provides an example.

Material/Technical Submissions

These are generally focused upon items of equipment and materials that will be selected and manufactured to meet the design requirements as set out in the project specifications. The materials and equipment can range from details of pipework/cables to generator and chillers.

Material Submissions are usually issued by the general contractor / main contractor for approval by the design team. The commissioning manager should also support in reviewing these documents.

Drawings 

The designer will usually issue a full set of design drawings to the project – these will detail the expectations relating to what should be installed where, sizes, flow rates, and any simple control logic, etc. The general contractor / main contractor would take these drawings, fully coordinate the services, and produce ‘shop drawings’ / ‘working drawings’.

These shop/working drawings should be reviewed and commented upon by the project team [designer, commissioning consultant].

Testing Procedures 

Testing procedures should be developed by the General Contractor / Main Contractor for the future commissioning works – these will range from early testing requirements such as Weld / Pressure Testing all the way through to the final building-integrated testing.

These testing procedures should be reviewed and commented upon by the commissioning consultant, coordinating with other team members such as the designer and facilities staff.

Testing Sequence and Programme

The expected testing program and sequence of works should generally be developed by the general contractor / main contractor.

This testing program/sequence should be reviewed and commented upon by the commissioning consultant, coordinating with other team members such as the designer and facilities staff.

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